When Should You Die? Actuarially Speaking

This was depressing. On the bright side I should have another 50 years to write about a topic that’s more uplifting. The graph below shows the number of years a person is expected to live given their age. The data is sourced from the actuarial life table published on the Social Security website.

Life Expectancy by Age

Life Expectancy by Age

Probability of Dying Within One Year

Probability of Dying Within One Year

Graph/Data Details

The life expectancy at a given age is the average remaining number of years expected prior to death for a person at that exact age, born on January 1, using the mortality rates for 2009 over the course of his or her remaining life.

A period life table is based on the mortality experience of a population during a relatively short period of time. Here we present the 2009 period life table for the Social Security area population. For this table, the period life expectancy at a given age is the average remaining number of years expected prior to death for a person at that exact age, born on January 1, using the mortality rates for 2009 over the course of his or her remaining life

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4 Responses

  1. Joubert says:

    I actually find this incredibly beautiful for some reason. I really enjoyed this, thank you.

  2. mjswart says:

    It should be “Midlife” not “Midlife crisis”.
    Alternatively, you can change the other labels to:
    * Highschool prom
    * College exams
    * Retirement home
    🙂

  3. GJM says:

    I have long thought that the stats for life expectancy are seriously skewed and it may be a few years before things straighten out. The expected life expectancies are based on those that have gone before, but with two world wars where significant numbers of the young and healthy males were sent off to war and killed, maimed, exposed to high stress and poor conditions, whereas the women lived in relatively benign conditions (no disparagement intended here BTW), then the life expectancies of the males are artificially lower, as many damaged ones returned, unhealthy ones were excluded from service etc. I have never seen any accounting for this fact.

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